Do We Really Need to Regulate Drone Airspace? NASA Thinks So

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With all the drones flying around in the sky, there is surprisingly little regulation in place for managing them. NASA has realized that someone has got to stop it all from descending into chaos.

Researchers at NASA’s Moffet Federal Airfield are working on a complex air traffic control system that would be designed solely for drone aircraft, or any flying aircraft below 400 feet. The system would include provisions to stop drones from flying into buildings and other aircraft while also including no-fly zones preventing any unwanted snooping on federal buildings.

However, for commercial drone operations to take off in the US, the approval of the Federal Aviation Administration is still needed. The agency has so far taken a hard line on any paid work using drones, but says it’s looking to propose new rules before the end of the year.

It’s important to note that for now the system wouldn’t have direct communication with an off-the-shelf drone. It is principally designed for commercial drones like Amazon Prime Air and Google’s ‘Wing’ project. Small, cheap drones are proving increasingly popular for both hobbyists and technology companies alike, but while the technology itself is ready to fly, controlling the airspace is a trickier proposition.

Last week, Google unveiled Project Wing, an experimental drone delivery program that sent half-helicopter, half-airplane drones buzzing around remote farmland in Australia. But how would this system work in populated areas or cities? Who would keep the airspace crash-free?

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