Wearable Meets Medical

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We are all familiar with wearable tech like Fitbit that screams, “Look at me, I’m a jogger! Be impressed by my fitness!” But in reality, they aren’t much use as medical devices. Medical practice has used lab monitoring for many years, but the moment the patient leaves, so does most of the opportunity to monitor the treatment in a meaningful way. That might be changing. The Google X research division — home to Glass and WiFi by balloon — has announced plans for a wearable device designed to monitor patients with the kind of accuracy and reliability medicine would find useful.

It’s a brilliant idea that, in many ways, makes more sense than most of the consumer wearable applications littering the market right now. Initially, they are targeting clinical trials, but I could see this going much wider. Imagine a not-too-distant future where your doctor dispenses prescriptions along with the watch needed to track the efficacy of the treatment in real time. I have no idea which parameters could be tracked without compromising the skin, but we already track things like blood oxygen level and alcohol that way, so I imagine the opportunity is out there.

At first glance, this looks like something of a niche play, but if you factor in the enormous growth in conditions like diabetes and childhood asthma (both of which benefit from constant measurement of critical levels), I wouldn’t be surprised to see the early versions of this kind of tech seeing very rapid adoption. It’s good to see yet another technology imagined in Star Trek becoming reality. Now if only we could figure out matter transportation too.

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